…start using R, from scratch!

Some time ago, since I was able to use R by myself, have found some fellows and other people who wanted to learn R as well. Then I pointed them to help pages, to CRAN repositories… but in some cases they said that didn’t know how to start using those resources. Obviously, the main self-perceived limitation for non-programmers is the use of “commands” -ok, many of the 80’s kids will remember the use of some command lines to access games such as PacMan, Frogger… :).

At the same time, they also wanted to refresh some basic statistics, acquiring a general knowledge of their data before asking for a statistician’s help. An idea to quickly help them was to make some scripts to guide them through basic commands, seeing results on real-time, and being able to recycle them for their own data.

If you have just started using R, maybe they can be useful for you. However, I will recommend that you use some open “plain text” file(s) to paste your favorite commands and clone/modify them to suit your needs. Remember to store the files where you can access them later!

  • Tip: you can change the extension of your mytext.txt file into mytext.R file, telling Windows to open it with the Notepad again. It will be also a plain text document, but some text editors will recognize it as an “R script” and will highlight the content according to that.
  • Apart from the Notepad in Windows, you also have a bunch of other text/code editors which are more pleasant to use. See for example R-studio and Notepad ++.

Copy the Gists below into your own text files, and begin playing with R!

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Using gdata, for MS Windows users

I use both GNU-Linux and Windows systems on a regular basis… so I’m aware of the advantages (more for GNU-Linux in my case) and disadvantages of both.

Recently I needed to analyse a database from a remote location, an Excel (*xlsx) file.

The problem was that I couldn’t put my gdata library to work… some weird errors about a missing Perl interpreter… just needed to install one. Based on this tutorial in CRAN, I downloaded ActivePerl.

Then, I followed the instructions to install it, leaving the default options. The program sets the PATH to the interpreter, so R can finally find Perl…

Just start then a R session… Done!